Archive for the ‘chickens’ Category

Another Good Reason to Go Organic

Friday, August 19th, 2011

According to Scientific American this week not only Cargill, but also our government has some responsibility for problems with food safety. In fact the government is being cited by some as having knowledge of the fact that antibiotic resistant Salmonella in poultry existed. It would seem that over use of antibiotics has led to the current crisis, and may be destined to be repeated if practices are not changed.

The well publicized turkey recall was one of the largest ever.  In a self defeating cycle, the bacteria which is immune to common drugs has been on the rise on meat producing farms. In fact Scientific American goes on to say that the bulk of U.S. antibiotics are used in factory farming.

A proposal which suggests that “by going organic, poultry farms can cut the amount of antibiotic resistant bacteria in a single generation by nearly five times, according to a new study published online this week in Environmental Health Perspectives.” (more…)

Mariah the Brave Chicken

Tuesday, July 5th, 2011

Every animal that touches our lives has something that they can teach us, if we only pay attention. Vitamin L or Vitamin Love helped this little chicken heal. Even a pet chicken can make you rethink and respect the value of life.

Having backyard chickens has become more and more common even within the suburbs around Boston. The idea of keeping pets that can actually give you food, like the chicken’s egg, makes owning these animals a sustainable idea. And beyond that, there are many levels of involvement.

Pet chickens have many benefits. First of all, watching chickens interacting and their free range grazing is actually almost mesmerizing as they forage through the yard. The chickens or even guinea hens will dig around in the grasses and eat ticks, bugs, mosquitos and reduce pests. You can compost your vegetables twice. Chicken manure is one of the best fertilizers. The chicken manure will help fertilize the flowers or garden. You can pass the scraps from your food preparation and left overs, which are not fit for the dogs to the chickens. Buying organic chicken food for them will add to the quality and taste of you home grown eggs.

The difficulty is keeping up the safety of the chicken from wild animals and domestic dogs that can chase and kill the birds, And this is where the story of Mariah begins. I had gotten some baby guineas  and chickens and then had lost several from wild animals and sadly even my own dogs who would chase the birds in an instinctive behavior and killed them. I had become so upset with my dogs (that I love) that they could not tell the difference from my pet chickens and the raw food they were eating for dinner. I had only named one chicken Mariah as it was too depressing to know that your pets could get taken away very easily.

In April of 2010 we went to New York City and returned at midnight. I went out to check the chickens and noticed that Mariah had some feathers hanging in front of her body. WIth a closer look realized that her skin and feathers had been torn off her back and most of her skin was hanging off of her. It was terrible. I called to my husband and told him we needed to get to the clinic immediately. Now my husband has helped me before but not with a bird. He is an attorney and will help out and with it being 12:30 AM I had to force him to become my technician this time.

With even closer examination in surgery I realized that Mariah’s crop had been ripped open and her esophagus was cut in half.. She was keeping steady and allowing me to examine her. Two hours later after using Ketamine anesthesia, Frankincense and lavender, rescue remedy and a 6 package of Vicryl suture I was able to reattach her esophagus and repair her crop and try to move her skin over her back. A lot of the skin was damaged but with lots of Ozonated saline the skin regained more oxygen.
Because she is an organically raised antibiotics were not a wanted option. So she was cared for with homeopathy  Aconite for shock, Arnica for bruising and pain, calendula as a  natural antibiotic, and ledum homeopathy for the punctures and tearing of the skin.
She needed ozone subcutaneously  and had a body bagging of herself with ozoneated saline flushes. She also had topical ozonated olive oil and calendula gel. She even bravely laid her eggs for the next 2 days. Later the egg laying stopped for 2 months as she regained her strength and  then after recovering started laying an egg each day.

Her wounds all healed without drugs and when you see her running around my yard happy you see this bird who is a survivor. Her feathers make her look quite different as she runs through the  woods. The wind blows her strange lack of feathers. In the winter she keeps her neck contracted to allow her feathers to cover her neck.

What I learned about from Mariah was the desire to survive and give back. I thank her every day for her eggs. I saw how the integrative way to care for an animal allowed our family friend to live on thanks to  an organic lifestyle. To be able to choose an organic approach to healing has wonderful benefits and the out come is outstanding​.